• Sierra Leone Laws

    published: 07 Apr 2015
  • Christian Lawyers Centre for Legal Assistance and Policy Reforms

    Christian Lawyers Centre for Legal Assistance and Policy Reforms is an International Christian legal company and advocacy group that seeks to provide legal assistance and support, promote justice and human rights compliance; and enhance policy reforms in Sierra Leone. It was launched on the 10th of Dec 2014, the International Day of Human Rights by Rashid Justice Dumbuya in Scotland, United Kingdom.

    published: 11 Dec 2014
  • THERE IS NO LAW AND ORDER IN SIERRA LEONE-ASB

    published: 24 Oct 2016
  • Sierra Leone Bar Association, Freetown Personal Injury Lawyers | اداره شهربانی به مسجد | بوکان |

    98 21 8879 4243 https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/ladies-clothing.html IRCLS (Hendizadeh & Associates, Attorney At Law) is a full service business law firm located in Tehran. Established in 1977, the firm has a balance

    published: 18 Sep 2016
  • Meet Mbalu from Sierra Leone - A day in her life

    Meet Mbalu, a Plan International sponsored child from Sierra Leone. We gave her a camera to show us a day in her life. Mbalu lives with her family where her parents are petty traders in the market. Mbalu enjoys school and is supported to stay in education by the 'Girls Education Challenge' which provide learning materials. Mbalu is part of the 'Child Advocacy Programme' where she learns about girls' rights. She wants to become a lawyer in the future.

    published: 08 May 2017
  • Daughter Of Sierra Leone

    She survived months as a sex slave and escaped to Australia as a refugee. Aminata Conteh-Biger can't change the past but now she's ready to help the future of her homeland, which has become the world's most dangerous place to give birth.

    published: 07 Mar 2017
  • LWOB video Michelle Sanson.wmv

    A brief testimonial by Dr Michelle Sanson, a pro bono lawyer with Lawyers Without Borders from Sydney, Australia, who has worked on two projects to date, one in Namibia and the other in Sierra Leone.

    published: 02 Apr 2012
  • Comments from prosecutor and defence lawyer as court upholds Taylor sentence

    The decision to uphold the conviction and 50-year sentence of former Liberian President Charles Taylor has been welcomed by prosecution lawyers, but his defence say they are disappointed. The appeals chamber of the Special Court for Sierra Leone in the Hague upheld the 65-year-old Taylor's conviction on Thursday, on 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity including terrorism, murder, rape and using child soldiers. Brenda Hollis, the International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutor, said, "This final decision affirms Taylor's responsibility for grave crimes which caused untold suffering to many thousands, if not tens of thousands of victims in Sierra Leone." "Today's judgment brings some measure of justice to those victims who suffered so horribly because of Charles Taylor," she...

    published: 31 Jul 2015
  • LAWYERS AND HUMAN RIGHTS GROUPS COMMENT AHEAD OF TAYLOR SENTENCE

    On Wednesday, an international war crimes court will deliver its sentence on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor. In a landmark ruling in April, judges at the Special Court for Sierra Leone found Taylor guilty of 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity, including murder, rape and conscripting child soldiers. Judges at the United Nations-backed court said his aid was essential in helping rebels in Sierra Leone continue their bloody rampage during the West African nation's decade-long civil war, which ended in 2002 with more than 50-thousand people dead. Judges found Taylor helped the rebels obtain weapons in full knowledge they would likely be used to commit terrible crimes, in exchange for payments of "blood diamonds" often obtained by slave labour. It was th...

    published: 31 Jul 2015
  • WRAP Taylor appears in court, soundbite in court, adds interior, lawyer

    AP TELEVISION 1. Wide of large television screen broadcasting judge and panel on the trial of Charles Taylor, at the UN compound in Freetown 2. Wide of large television screen broadcasting Charles Taylor at trial with security guard next to him 3. Wide of large television screen broadcasting judge speaking during the trial 4. Mid of soldier with rifle on security alert 5. Exterior of soldiers guarding white vehicle as it enters UN Compound 6. Interior of audience watching the trial of Charles Taylor on large format screen 7. Various, audience 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Charles Taylor, Former Liberian President: (Broadcast on large television screen) "If it pleases the court I would like to respond to all eleven counts at the end because there are some issues that I would like to me...

    published: 30 Jul 2015
  • Tribunal finds rebel leaders guilty of crimes against humanity

    1. Mid of flag flying at the Special Court 2. Wide exterior of court 3. Wide of people walking into court 4. Mid of security guards checking bags 5. Mid of lawyers entering court gallery 6. Wide interior of people waiting in court gallery ++MUTE++ 7. Interior of courtroom 8. Accused Revolutionary United Front (RUF) members entering court 9. Various of accused Issa Hassan Sesay shaking hands with defence lawyers ++AUDIO RESUMES++ 10. People watching from gallery 11. Trial judge reading judgement against first accused, Issa Sesay 12. Sesay listening to the judgment 13. Trial judge reading judgement 14. Sesay listening to the judge, shaking his head 15. Mid of second accused, Morris Kallon 16. Mid of third accused, Augustine Gbao 17. Wide of defence counsel for Issa Sesay, ...

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • Victim of violence during Taylor''s rule reacts to conviction

    (26 Apr 2012) 1. Edward Conteh, President of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-Wounded Association, giving interview in front of court building 2. Cutaway of court sign 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Edward Conteh, President of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-Wounded Association: "Well this is a clear message for African leaders, even in my country Sierra Leone. So, I am happy about the verdict." 4. Media outside court building 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Edward Conteh, President of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-Wounded Association: "I feel 85 percent happy, because the 25 percent (sic) is why did they suspend (the sentencing)? I want to see this man behind bars for the rest of his life." 6. Cutaway of flag 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Edward Conteh, President of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-...

    published: 30 Jul 2015
  • ALL SIERRA LEONEANS ARE EQUAL BEFORE THE LAW-ALPHA SAIDU BANGURA.

    published: 21 Nov 2016
  • What is COMMON LAW? What does COMMON LAW mean? COMMON LAW meaning, definition & explanation

    What is COMMON LAW? What does COMMON LAW mean? COMMON LAW meaning, definition & explanation. common law (also known as case law or precedent) is law developed by judges, courts, and similar tribunals, stated in decisions that nominally decide individual cases but that in addition have precedential effect on future cases. Common law is a third branch of law, in contrast to and on equal footing with statutes which are adopted through the legislative process, and regulations which are promulgated by the executive branch. A "common law system" is a legal system that gives great precedential weight to common law, so that consistent principles applied to similar facts yield similar outcomes. The body of past common law binds judges that make future decisions, just as any other law does, to ens...

    published: 28 Jul 2016
  • Street Life In Sierra Leone

    Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa with a lot of natural resources but yet still is one of the poorest country's in the world. It is a former British Colony known as the Lion Mountain. Sierra Leone is one of the country's in Sub Sahara Africa that has suffered so much. First is the 12years rebel war that left the country in total destructions, economic destability, lower life expentancy, increase in child Mortality and recently one of the issues the country is facing after the deadly Ebola outbreak is the increase in teenage prostitution and how the police uses the law to abuse this young girls. I set out to find out why?

    published: 08 Mar 2016
  • Working with Free Access to Law Initiatives Narratives from Africa:Ann Asugah

    LVI2012 http://blog.law.cornell.edu/lvi2012/ In 2012, we mark the 20th Anniversary of the Legal Information Institute at Cornell Law School, the first legal website on the Internet and the birthplace of the free law, open access movement. This year also marks the 10th Anniversary of the Declaration on Free Access to Law, a document crafted and signed by delegates from more than a dozen countries assembled at the Law Via the Internet (LVI) conference in 2002. To mark this achievement and to strategize for the next 20 years, the 2012 LVI conference will be held in the United States for the first time, at the birthplace of the open access, free law movement, Cornell Law School in Ithaca, NY. Working with Free Access to Law Initiatives: Narratives from Africa Presentation speakers A...

    published: 20 Oct 2012
Sierra Leone Laws

Sierra Leone Laws

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:54
  • Updated: 07 Apr 2015
  • views: 691
videos
https://wn.com/Sierra_Leone_Laws
Christian Lawyers Centre for Legal Assistance and Policy Reforms

Christian Lawyers Centre for Legal Assistance and Policy Reforms

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:58
  • Updated: 11 Dec 2014
  • views: 100
videos
Christian Lawyers Centre for Legal Assistance and Policy Reforms is an International Christian legal company and advocacy group that seeks to provide legal assistance and support, promote justice and human rights compliance; and enhance policy reforms in Sierra Leone. It was launched on the 10th of Dec 2014, the International Day of Human Rights by Rashid Justice Dumbuya in Scotland, United Kingdom.
https://wn.com/Christian_Lawyers_Centre_For_Legal_Assistance_And_Policy_Reforms
THERE IS NO LAW AND ORDER IN SIERRA LEONE-ASB

THERE IS NO LAW AND ORDER IN SIERRA LEONE-ASB

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:25
  • Updated: 24 Oct 2016
  • views: 387
videos
https://wn.com/There_Is_No_Law_And_Order_In_Sierra_Leone_Asb
Sierra Leone Bar Association, Freetown Personal Injury Lawyers | اداره شهربانی به مسجد | بوکان |

Sierra Leone Bar Association, Freetown Personal Injury Lawyers | اداره شهربانی به مسجد | بوکان |

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:01
  • Updated: 18 Sep 2016
  • views: 6
videos
98 21 8879 4243 https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/ladies-clothing.html IRCLS (Hendizadeh & Associates, Attorney At Law) is a full service business law firm located in Tehran. Established in 1977, the firm has a balance
https://wn.com/Sierra_Leone_Bar_Association,_Freetown_Personal_Injury_Lawyers_|_اداره_شهربانی_به_مسجد_|_بوکان_|
Meet Mbalu from Sierra Leone - A day in her life

Meet Mbalu from Sierra Leone - A day in her life

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:48
  • Updated: 08 May 2017
  • views: 17
videos
Meet Mbalu, a Plan International sponsored child from Sierra Leone. We gave her a camera to show us a day in her life. Mbalu lives with her family where her parents are petty traders in the market. Mbalu enjoys school and is supported to stay in education by the 'Girls Education Challenge' which provide learning materials. Mbalu is part of the 'Child Advocacy Programme' where she learns about girls' rights. She wants to become a lawyer in the future.
https://wn.com/Meet_Mbalu_From_Sierra_Leone_A_Day_In_Her_Life
Daughter Of Sierra Leone

Daughter Of Sierra Leone

  • Order:
  • Duration: 25:49
  • Updated: 07 Mar 2017
  • views: 5299
videos
She survived months as a sex slave and escaped to Australia as a refugee. Aminata Conteh-Biger can't change the past but now she's ready to help the future of her homeland, which has become the world's most dangerous place to give birth.
https://wn.com/Daughter_Of_Sierra_Leone
LWOB video Michelle Sanson.wmv

LWOB video Michelle Sanson.wmv

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:07
  • Updated: 02 Apr 2012
  • views: 209
videos
A brief testimonial by Dr Michelle Sanson, a pro bono lawyer with Lawyers Without Borders from Sydney, Australia, who has worked on two projects to date, one in Namibia and the other in Sierra Leone.
https://wn.com/Lwob_Video_Michelle_Sanson.Wmv
Comments from prosecutor and defence lawyer as court upholds Taylor sentence

Comments from prosecutor and defence lawyer as court upholds Taylor sentence

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:42
  • Updated: 31 Jul 2015
  • views: 38
videos
The decision to uphold the conviction and 50-year sentence of former Liberian President Charles Taylor has been welcomed by prosecution lawyers, but his defence say they are disappointed. The appeals chamber of the Special Court for Sierra Leone in the Hague upheld the 65-year-old Taylor's conviction on Thursday, on 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity including terrorism, murder, rape and using child soldiers. Brenda Hollis, the International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutor, said, "This final decision affirms Taylor's responsibility for grave crimes which caused untold suffering to many thousands, if not tens of thousands of victims in Sierra Leone." "Today's judgment brings some measure of justice to those victims who suffered so horribly because of Charles Taylor," she added. But Taylor's defence lawyers said he should have been acquitted, on the grounds that the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia had set a precedent that in order to aid and abet a crime, a suspect had to have "specifically directed" aid toward committing crimes. "What we now have as a consequence of this judgment in the landscape of international criminal law is an entirely chaotic jurisprudence. The law on aiding and abetting now has, if you will, different meaning in different courts in The Hague," said appeal counsel Morris Anyah. But judges in the Taylor case openly disagreed with that. They said the key to guilt in aiding and abetting a crime is that a suspect's participation encouraged the commission of crimes and had a substantial effect on the crimes actually being committed - not the particular manner in which a suspect was involved. Taylor was convicted not only of aiding and abetting Sierra Leone rebels from his seat of power in neighbouring Liberia, but also for actually planning some of the attacks carried out by two Sierra Leone rebel groups - the Revolutionary United Front and the Armed Forces Revolutionary Council. In return he was given "blood diamonds" mined by slave labourers in Sierra Leone and gained political influence in volatile West Africa. Prosecuting Taylor proved how hard it is to bring leaders to justice. He fled into exile in Nigeria after being indicted in 2003 and wasn't arrested for three years. And while the Sierra Leone court is based in that country's capital, Taylor's trial was staged in the Netherlands for fear it could destabilise the region. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/f000b70d8f776d1c447a5ddafa749bf7 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Comments_From_Prosecutor_And_Defence_Lawyer_As_Court_Upholds_Taylor_Sentence
LAWYERS AND HUMAN RIGHTS GROUPS COMMENT AHEAD OF TAYLOR SENTENCE

LAWYERS AND HUMAN RIGHTS GROUPS COMMENT AHEAD OF TAYLOR SENTENCE

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:28
  • Updated: 31 Jul 2015
  • views: 114
videos
On Wednesday, an international war crimes court will deliver its sentence on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor. In a landmark ruling in April, judges at the Special Court for Sierra Leone found Taylor guilty of 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity, including murder, rape and conscripting child soldiers. Judges at the United Nations-backed court said his aid was essential in helping rebels in Sierra Leone continue their bloody rampage during the West African nation's decade-long civil war, which ended in 2002 with more than 50-thousand people dead. Judges found Taylor helped the rebels obtain weapons in full knowledge they would likely be used to commit terrible crimes, in exchange for payments of "blood diamonds" often obtained by slave labour. It was the first time a former head of state had been convicted of war crimes since the aftermath of World War II. Taylor is due to be sentenced on May 30, with prosecutors demanding an 80-year prison term, and defence lawyers arguing he should at least be given a sentence that leaves him some hope for life after release. Defence attorney Courtenay Griffiths argued for a sentence that reflects Taylor's indirect role: he was found guilty only of aiding the rebels, not leading them, as prosecutors originally charged. "It's questionable from our point of view whether the imposition of such a long sentence will have any real impact because people will see through the falsity of the reasoning behind the imposition of such a sentence," Griffiths said. Griffiths said the 80 year sentencing demand was disproportionate for Taylor, who is 64. "If Taylor's verdict is really ending the idea of immunity, then it should equally apply to powerful countries as it does to weaker countries like Liberia, so it is a very important precedent in that regard", Griffiths said. However, he added that he doubted "this decision will act as a restraint upon Russia, upon the United States, against the powerful countries in this world". The prosecution and human rights groups underlined the significance of the sentence as a precedent as well as for the victims in Sierra Leone and Liberia. "What it will do is it will ensure that people who are eventually held to account and are tried will know that the international community is taking this seriously and will continue to take this seriously, and hopefully if the sentence reflects that, that will also reinforce that position", said Andie Lambe of the London-based human rights group "Global Witness". Taylor said during his sentencing hearing on May 16 that he sympathises with victims of the civil war in Sierra Leone he helped foment, and asked judges to render their sentence against him in a spirit of "reconciliation, not retribution." However, he stopped short of admitting any wrongdoing, apologising for his actions, or expressing remorse. He insisted his actions had actually been designed to help stabilise the region and claimed he never knowingly assisted in the commission of crimes. Taylor fled into exile in Nigeria after being indicted by the court in 2003 and wasn't arrested for three years. While the Sierra Leone court is formally based in that country's capital, Taylor's trial is being staged in Leidschendam, a suburb of The Hague, Netherlands, for fear holding it in West Africa could destabilise the region. Taylor is awaiting the sentencing in his cell in a special international wing of a Dutch jail in The Hague. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/db6a5bb0bc1f46e048d0825c5946782c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Lawyers_And_Human_Rights_Groups_Comment_Ahead_Of_Taylor_Sentence
WRAP Taylor appears in court, soundbite in court, adds interior, lawyer

WRAP Taylor appears in court, soundbite in court, adds interior, lawyer

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:37
  • Updated: 30 Jul 2015
  • views: 9
videos
AP TELEVISION 1. Wide of large television screen broadcasting judge and panel on the trial of Charles Taylor, at the UN compound in Freetown 2. Wide of large television screen broadcasting Charles Taylor at trial with security guard next to him 3. Wide of large television screen broadcasting judge speaking during the trial 4. Mid of soldier with rifle on security alert 5. Exterior of soldiers guarding white vehicle as it enters UN Compound 6. Interior of audience watching the trial of Charles Taylor on large format screen 7. Various, audience 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Charles Taylor, Former Liberian President: (Broadcast on large television screen) "If it pleases the court I would like to respond to all eleven counts at the end because there are some issues that I would like to mention here about the recognition of this court. Another issue is that I would not be able to put in a plea at this particular time. There's an issue here regarding this court and it's right to exercise jurisdiction over me as the twenty first President of the republic of Liberia. The other issue is about how I got here. If it pleases you, your honour, these to me are fundamental issues so for me it is not a matter now of entering a plea because I do not recognise the jurisdiction of this court." UNTV 9. Judge and panel on the trial of Charles Taylor, at the UN compound in Freetown 10. Various of former Liberian President Charles Taylor at trial 11. Judge STORYLINE: Former Liberian President Charles Taylor pleaded not guilty Monday to war crimes and crimes against humanity, including sexual slavery, mutilation and sending children into combat. Taylor at first said he could not plead on the charges, which stem from his role in Sierra Leone's civil war, because he did not recognise the court. But after Justice Richard Lussick insisted, Taylor said calmly: "Most definitely, your honour, I did not and could not have committed those acts against the sister republic of Sierra Leone.'' Lussick accepted Taylor's that as a plea of "not guilty.'' Taylor was once feared across the region for fomenting violence in his homeland, in Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast and elsewhere. Court officials have asked that the trial be moved to Europe because of fears Taylor can still spark unrest in West Africa. Taylor, accused of backing a particularly brutal Sierra Leone rebel group, said through his lawyer that he feared for his safety in Sierra Leone, but wanted to be tried in the region, in part because it would be easier for defence witnesses to appear here. While most reporters watched on closed circuit TV from elsewhere in the complex, the audience area in the court chamber was filled with more than 100 people - among them Liberia's ambassador and members of Taylor's family. Taylor faces 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity in connection with alleged backing of Sierra Leonean rebels. He has repeatedly declared he is innocent of charges that include mutilation, sexual slavery and sending children into combat. Taylor won a disputed election in Liberia in 1997. Many former allies in an insurgency he had launched in 1989 took up arms against him in 2000 and attacked Monrovia in 2003. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c32f6a4c24ba5dfb66461919279b26ae Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Wrap_Taylor_Appears_In_Court,_Soundbite_In_Court,_Adds_Interior,_Lawyer
Tribunal finds rebel leaders guilty of crimes against humanity

Tribunal finds rebel leaders guilty of crimes against humanity

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:50
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 512
videos
1. Mid of flag flying at the Special Court 2. Wide exterior of court 3. Wide of people walking into court 4. Mid of security guards checking bags 5. Mid of lawyers entering court gallery 6. Wide interior of people waiting in court gallery ++MUTE++ 7. Interior of courtroom 8. Accused Revolutionary United Front (RUF) members entering court 9. Various of accused Issa Hassan Sesay shaking hands with defence lawyers ++AUDIO RESUMES++ 10. People watching from gallery 11. Trial judge reading judgement against first accused, Issa Sesay 12. Sesay listening to the judgment 13. Trial judge reading judgement 14. Sesay listening to the judge, shaking his head 15. Mid of second accused, Morris Kallon 16. Mid of third accused, Augustine Gbao 17. Wide of defence counsel for Issa Sesay, Wayne Jordash, meeting Sesay's relatives 18. Various of Sesay's relatives and counsel leaving courtroom 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Wayne Jordash, Defence Counsel for Issa Sesay: "Deeply disappointing, deeply disappointing. I think we must have been in different trials to the judges. It's not my recollection of the evidence." 20. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Cammegh, Defence Counsel for Augustine Gbao: "We're very grateful to the judge for the sentence because he dissented on every single count which Augustine Gbao was convicted so obviously we were able to satisfy him with our arguments, we weren't able to satisfy the other two judges but it's not over yet." 21. Wide of Tamba Finnoh, victim of an RUF attack, present at the judgement 22. Close up of victim's amputated arm 23. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tamba Finnoh, RUF victim: "The judges they know better than me. They know on the basis upon which they passed the verdict so (inaudible) I get a side for take actually." 24. Various of lead prosecutor, Stephen Rapp in his office 25. SOUNDBITE: (English) Stephen Rapp, Lead Prosecutor: "The terrible crimes were committed against the innocent people of Sierra Leone. It respects the suffering of the multitude of victims, who were mutilated or enslaved or murdered or raped and were rendered homeless or destitute." 26. Mid of flag flying at court 27. Wide exterior of court STORYLINE: An international court modelled after the Nuremberg tribunal convicted three top Sierra Leone rebel leaders of crimes against humanity on Wednesday - the closest thing to justice in this West African nation of amputees, orphans and widows. Revolutionary United Front leader Issa Sesay and one of his battlefield commanders Morris Kallon were found guilty on 16 of 18 counts, including mutilation, terrorism, rape, forced marriage, sexual slavery and the enlistment of child soldiers. Another commander, Augustine Gbao, was found guilty on 14 of the 18 counts. All three had pleaded not guilty and shook their heads as the verdict was read. About a half-million people were victims of killings, systematic mutilation and other atrocities during Sierra Leone' 11-year civil war, which ended in 2002. Illicit diamond sales fuelled the conflict, rebels controlled the diamond fields and used the sale of the gem to buy guns. The rebels were allegedly trained and backed by Charles Taylor, the former warlord of neighbouring Liberia. For over a decade, the rebels roamed Sierra Leone's jungles, raiding villages, vying for control of the nation's diamond fields. Amputations became their hallmark and field commanders were known by names like 'Captain Two Hands' and 'Dr. Blood.' They used machetes, axes and knives and sat three astride their victims, who were forced to place their hands on concrete slabs or tree trunks. New conscripts - especially children - were given bags and told not to return until they had filled them with severed limbs. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1441c61b60b333228b15a665bdb71db2 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Tribunal_Finds_Rebel_Leaders_Guilty_Of_Crimes_Against_Humanity
Victim of violence during Taylor''s rule reacts to conviction

Victim of violence during Taylor''s rule reacts to conviction

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:08
  • Updated: 30 Jul 2015
  • views: 81
videos
(26 Apr 2012) 1. Edward Conteh, President of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-Wounded Association, giving interview in front of court building 2. Cutaway of court sign 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Edward Conteh, President of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-Wounded Association: "Well this is a clear message for African leaders, even in my country Sierra Leone. So, I am happy about the verdict." 4. Media outside court building 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Edward Conteh, President of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-Wounded Association: "I feel 85 percent happy, because the 25 percent (sic) is why did they suspend (the sentencing)? I want to see this man behind bars for the rest of his life." 6. Cutaway of flag 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Edward Conteh, President of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-Wounded Association: "By the forces - kids pointed gun at me, kicked me by my chest. When I was begging, they kicked me, stepped on my foot and my hand (shows) and amputated my hand. I was left there to die, but I survived." 8. Wide exterior of court building 9. Wide of news conference with Charles Taylor''s lawyer, Courtenay Griffiths QC 10. Cutaway of photographer 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Courtenay Griffiths QC, Charles Taylor''s lawyer: "Interestingly not a mention of Naomi Campbell or Mia Farrow or indeed Carole White, Naomi Campbell''s agent. What was that evidence about then? What relevance did that evidence have to anything these judges have found? So why did this court go to the great expense of flying them in the middle of our case, mind you, to give evidence? What has it proved? Nothing at all. A large fat zero." 12. Taylor''s defence team STORYLINE A Sierra Leone war amputee on Thursday welcomed the conviction of former Liberian President Charles Taylor of war crimes. An international court in the Netherlands found Taylor guilty of aiding and abetting war crimes and crimes against humanity for supporting notoriously brutal rebels in neighbouring Sierra Leone in return for "blood diamonds". Edward Conteh of the Sierra Leone Amputee and War-Wounded Association came to Leidschendam near The Hague to attend the historic trial. "Well this is a clear message for African leaders, even in my country Sierra Leone. So, I am happy about the verdict," he said. Conteh recalled the day he had his arm amputated by Sierra Leone rebels. "Kids pointed gun at me, kicked me by my chest. When I was begging, they kicked me, stepped on my foot and my hand (shows) and amputated my hand. I was left there to die, but I survived," he said. Conteh expressed the hope that Taylor spends "the rest of his life" behind bars. Presiding Judge Richard Lussick scheduled a sentencing hearing for May 16, and said it would be announced two weeks later. Taylor will serve his sentence in Britain. The court does not have maximum sentences or the death penalty. In the past, convicted Sierra Leone rebel leaders have received sentences of up to 52 years. Taylor is the first head of state convicted by an international court since the post-World War II Nuremberg military tribunal. Lussick said the 64-year-old warlord-turned-president provided arms, ammunition, communications equipment and planning to rebels responsible for countless atrocities in the 1991-2002 Sierra Leone civil war. Lussick called the support "sustained and significant." Taylor''s lawyer, Courtenay Griffiths, slammed the conviction as based on "tainted and corrupt evidence." Griffiths questioned why the lengthy judgement did not mention evidence given by the most famous prosecution witness - Naomi Campbell. The supermodel told judges she had received diamonds at a function in South Africa, but did not link them to Taylor. Her testimony yielded "a large, fat, zero," the lawyer said. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/8697d3d061b3a80e516871de5abb4d84 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Victim_Of_Violence_During_Taylor''s_Rule_Reacts_To_Conviction
ALL SIERRA LEONEANS ARE EQUAL BEFORE THE LAW-ALPHA SAIDU BANGURA.

ALL SIERRA LEONEANS ARE EQUAL BEFORE THE LAW-ALPHA SAIDU BANGURA.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:41
  • Updated: 21 Nov 2016
  • views: 512
videos
https://wn.com/All_Sierra_Leoneans_Are_Equal_Before_The_Law_Alpha_Saidu_Bangura.
What is COMMON LAW? What does COMMON LAW mean? COMMON LAW meaning, definition & explanation

What is COMMON LAW? What does COMMON LAW mean? COMMON LAW meaning, definition & explanation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:55
  • Updated: 28 Jul 2016
  • views: 393
videos
What is COMMON LAW? What does COMMON LAW mean? COMMON LAW meaning, definition & explanation. common law (also known as case law or precedent) is law developed by judges, courts, and similar tribunals, stated in decisions that nominally decide individual cases but that in addition have precedential effect on future cases. Common law is a third branch of law, in contrast to and on equal footing with statutes which are adopted through the legislative process, and regulations which are promulgated by the executive branch. A "common law system" is a legal system that gives great precedential weight to common law, so that consistent principles applied to similar facts yield similar outcomes. The body of past common law binds judges that make future decisions, just as any other law does, to ensure consistent treatment. In cases where the parties disagree on what the law is, a common law court looks to past precedential decisions of relevant courts. If a similar dispute has been resolved in the past, the court is usually bound to follow the reasoning used in the prior decision (this principle is known as stare decisis). If, however, the court finds that the current dispute is fundamentally distinct from all previous cases (called a "matter of first impression"), judges have the authority and duty to make law by creating precedent. Thereafter, the new decision becomes precedent, and will bind future courts. Stare decisis, the principle that cases should be decided according to consistent principled rules so that similar facts will yield similar results, lies at the heart of all common law systems. One third of the world's population live in common law jurisdictions or in systems mixed with civil law. Common law originated during the Middle Ages in England, and from there was propagated to the colonies of the British Empire, including India, the United States (both the federal system and 49 of its 50 states), Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, Canada (and all its provinces except Quebec), Malaysia, Ghana, Australia, Sri Lanka, Hong Kong, Singapore, Burma, Ireland, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Cyprus, Barbados, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Namibia, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Botswana, Guyana, and Fiji.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Common_Law_What_Does_Common_Law_Mean_Common_Law_Meaning,_Definition_Explanation
Street Life In Sierra Leone

Street Life In Sierra Leone

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  • Duration: 7:36
  • Updated: 08 Mar 2016
  • views: 26875
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Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa with a lot of natural resources but yet still is one of the poorest country's in the world. It is a former British Colony known as the Lion Mountain. Sierra Leone is one of the country's in Sub Sahara Africa that has suffered so much. First is the 12years rebel war that left the country in total destructions, economic destability, lower life expentancy, increase in child Mortality and recently one of the issues the country is facing after the deadly Ebola outbreak is the increase in teenage prostitution and how the police uses the law to abuse this young girls. I set out to find out why?
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Working with Free Access to Law Initiatives Narratives from Africa:Ann Asugah

Working with Free Access to Law Initiatives Narratives from Africa:Ann Asugah

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  • Duration: 8:36
  • Updated: 20 Oct 2012
  • views: 304
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LVI2012 http://blog.law.cornell.edu/lvi2012/ In 2012, we mark the 20th Anniversary of the Legal Information Institute at Cornell Law School, the first legal website on the Internet and the birthplace of the free law, open access movement. This year also marks the 10th Anniversary of the Declaration on Free Access to Law, a document crafted and signed by delegates from more than a dozen countries assembled at the Law Via the Internet (LVI) conference in 2002. To mark this achievement and to strategize for the next 20 years, the 2012 LVI conference will be held in the United States for the first time, at the birthplace of the open access, free law movement, Cornell Law School in Ithaca, NY. Working with Free Access to Law Initiatives: Narratives from Africa Presentation speakers Ann Muthoni Asugah, Assistant Editor and Team Leader, Laws of Kenya Department at the National Council for Law Reporting Bridget Osho, Coordinator, Sierra Leone Legal Information Institute (Sierra Lii) Gugu Vilakati, Community Website Content Developer, AfricanLII Jane Mugala, Coordinator, Uganda Legal Information Institute (ULII) Mateyu Sisya, Coordinator, Malawi Legal Information Institute (Malawilii) Thelma Mary Julie, Documentation Officer and Coordinator, SeyLII Ufuoma Lamikanra, Ag. Institute Librarian, Nigerian Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (NIALS), University of Lagos Campus Kerry Anderson, Co-founder and Coordinator, African Legal Information Institute Mariya Badeva-Bright The objective of the paper is to present narratives from legal information institutes (LIIs) in various stages of development from across Africa. Representations are made here from Kenya, Uganda, Malawi, Swaziland, the Seychelles, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. Within each of the narratives there lie significant lessons, which provide the basis for a regional community of African legal information institutes to share their knowledge with each other. http://blog.law.cornell.edu/lvi2012/wp-content/plugins/download-monitor/download.php?id=21
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